Dave Chappelle will have a building in his old school named after him

Months after being harassed by students at the Washington DC school, Dave Chappelle’s alma mater decided to name a theater after him.

The Duke Ellington School of the Arts has planned to open the Dave Chappelle Theater on June 20 with a dedication ceremony for the comedian, reports TMZ.

Chappelle visited the Duke Ellington School of the Arts to speak in November, but was met with fury from many of the students who currently attend the jokes he has made about transgender people in several Netflix comedy specials, with a 16-year-old calling him that of “child”. .’

The heated questions and answers became increasingly controversial between Chappelle and the students, with the comedian commenting, ‘I’m better than every instrumentalist, artist, no matter what art you make in this school, now I’m better than all of you. I’m sure that will change. I’m sure you’ll soon be household names.

Following the response from the school’s students, Chappelle launched an Instagram challenge to those opposing the school’s plans for a building named after him: Objection. ‘If you are in favor of the theater being called ‘Chappelle’, I ask that you make a donation to the school, noting your approval.’

Before launching the challenge, Chappelle was a generous donor to the school over the years, reportedly donating $100,000 and one of its Emmy Awards in 2017.

The Duke Ellington School of the Arts has planned the opening of the Dave Chappelle Theater on June 20 with a dedication ceremony to the comedian.

Dave Chappelle speaks at his Duke Ellington School of the Arts, where he will have a theater named after him

Dave Chappelle speaks at his Duke Ellington School of the Arts, where he will have a theater named after him

Duke Ellington School of the Arts in Washington D.C., where Chappelle graduated in 1991

Duke Ellington School of the Arts in Washington D.C., where Chappelle graduated in 1991

It appears that his opposition failed to raise enough money, and now his name will appear at the Dave Chappelle Theater.

Much of the backlash directed at Chappelle came after comments he made on his ‘The Closer’ special, including declaring ‘gender is a fact’ and lining up with Harry Potter author JK Rowling who claimed that transgender women are not were real women in 2019.

Daphne Dorman, a trans comedian and friend of Chappelle's, died in 2019 and is featured in Chappelle's Netflix special 'The Closer'

Daphne Dorman, a trans comedian and friend of Chappelle’s, died in 2019 and is featured in Chappelle’s Netflix special ‘The Closer’

He also jokes about the anatomy of trans women in the Netflix special, saying they don’t have real female reproductive organs and that they don’t have menstrual blood but ‘beet juice’.

Chappelle also spoke about his friend and transgender Daphne Dorman, who killed herself in 2019 at age 44 after defending Chappelle from earlier jokes he made.

‘When she did that, the trans community dragged that bitch on Twitter,’ Chappelle said in ‘The Closer’.

‘It’s a true story; my heart was broken,’ he continued. “I don’t know what was going on, but I bet dragging her didn’t help.

The jokes he made have resulted in a fierce backlash against the Ohio comedian, who says his documentary was pulled from film festivals and discarded by film distributors.

Organizations such as the National Black Justice Coalition and GLAAD condemned the jokes told in Chappelle’s special.

Chappelle's special 'The Closer' premiered on Netflix on October 5, 2021

Chappelle’s special ‘The Closer’, his latest in a series of comedy acts for Netflix, has ignited the debate surrounding his comments about transgender people and the LGBTQ community.

Chappelle’s jokes about the transgender community were supported by Netflix, with Netflix co-CEO Ted Sarandos defending the comedian in an internal email, saying ‘we don’t allow titles on Netflix designed to incite hatred or violence, and we don’t allow believe it crosses that line.’

Chappelle thanked the co-CEO on a later comedy show, telling the audience ‘thank God for Ted Sarandos on Netflix, he’s the only one who hasn’t canceled me yet.’

Netflix has faced backlash from the defense, including employee layoffs and an organized employee walkout last October.

Dave Chappelle and Netflix co-CEO Ted Sarandos are seen speaking backstage at the 36th Annual Rock & Roll Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony at Rocket Mortgage Fieldhouse on October 30, 2021 in Cleveland, Ohio

Dave Chappelle and Netflix co-CEO Ted Sarandos are seen speaking backstage at the 36th Annual Rock & Roll Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony at Rocket Mortgage Fieldhouse on October 30, 2021 in Cleveland, Ohio

But Sarandos later backtracked on his starting position, saying, ‘I messed up the internal communication – and I don’t just mean mechanically.’

Sarandos continued: ‘I feel like I should have been sure to acknowledge that a group of our employees were suffering a lot from the decision they had made, and I should have acknowledged it in advance before rationalizing anything for the pain they were going through. I say this because I deeply respect them and love the contribution they make to Netflix. They were hurting, and I should have recognized that first.

Many transgender activists felt that Chappelle’s comedy was an example of ‘punching’ a community with little power. In a video posted to his Instagram after the special, Chappelle said he would meet with the transgender community but would not ‘bow down to anyone’s demands’.

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